HTX-245 Mini Handheld 2m/70cm FM Amateur Transceiver
(190-1106)                 Preparation                Faxback Doc. # 58621

Introduction To Amateur Radio

Your transceiver is the perfect first radio for anyone entering the 
exciting world of amateur radio, as well a great additional transceiver 
for the experienced amateur radio operator.  Your transceiver opens a door 
for you to the world from almost anywhere!  All you need is an Amateur 
Radio Operator's License (Technician Class or higher) issued by the 
Federal Communications Commission (FCC).  If you do not have a license,
it is easier than ever to get one, and help from licensed operators is 
available.  Here are a few tips to help you get started.

You can turn on your transceiver and scan the entire band to hear what is 
going on; however, do not attempt to transmit until you get your license. 
If you transmit without a license, you are in violation of federal law 
that can lead to severe penalties.  Note that ham operators take the FCC 
rules very seriously and want nothing to do with "bootleggers" - their 
term for people who operate without a license.

Find out if there is a ham radio club in your area.  Most clubs welcome 
newcomers and are glad to help you get your license.  There are thousands 
of clubs across the country, so there is probably one in or near your 
community.  The staff at your local RadioShack store often can help you 
locate a club.

If you do not hear anyone talking about a local club as you listen to 
local transmissions, write to the American Radio Relay League (ARRL) at 
the following address to find out how to contact a local affiliate.  The 
ARRL is the national organization representing amateur radio in the United 
States.  The league has more than 150,000 members. Most are ham operators,
or members in the process of obtaining their license.

  The American Radio Relay League
  225 Main Street
  Newington, CT 06111
  http://www.arrl.org

Start studying for the license exams.  Do not be intimidated by the word 
"study," because most people can go from knowing absolutely nothing about 
Amateur radio to passing the Novice and Technician written exams in less 
than a month.

The exams test your knowledge of basic radio regulations and elementary 
radio theory.  Many clubs hold license classes which can be a fun and easy 
way to learn about amateur radio.  There are good books, cassette tapes, 
computer programs, and many other study aids available.  Your local Radio
Shack store sells FCC License Preparation study guides for amateur radio
operator licenses.  While you are no longer required to learn Morse code
for a Technician Class license, we encourage you to learn it anyway so you
can advance to higher levels of operating privileges.

There is no fee to take the Novice exam.  As soon as you pass the Novice 
exam, you can immediately take the Technician exam.  There is a small fee 
required for taking the Technician exam.  All license level tests are 
administered by a three-member Volunteer Examiner Team.  Contact the ARRL 
for a schedule of exam opportunities in your area. 

The Technician Class license lets you use the transceiver to communicate 
directly with other operators, and use repeaters for distant communication

Amateur radio is a great hobby that has enriched the lives of millions of 
people all over the world.  The ARRL would be glad to hear from you if you 
need more information or would like to join!

Preparation

You can operate your transceiver from any of three power sources:

  Internal batteries.

  AC power (using an optional AC adapter).

  Vehicle battery power (using an optional DC adapter).

Using Internal Batteries

You can power your transceiver using three alkaline, lithium, or 
rechargeable (Ni-Cd, or Ni-MH) AA batteries (not supplied).  All of these 
types of batteries are available at your local RadioShack store.

Using Non-Rechargeable Batteries

Follow these steps to install alkaline or other non-rechargeable batteries

1.  Pull the lock tab to a horizontal position.

2.  Grasp the lower corners of the battery compartment cover and remove
    the cover.

3.  Before you install alkaline or any other non-rechargeable batteries, 
    use a pointed object such as a straightened paper clip to set CHG ON/
    OFF inside the compartment to OFF.

4.  Put the batteries into the compartment according to the polarity 
    symbols (+ and -) marked inside.

    CAUTIONS:  Use only fresh batteries of the required size and 
               recommended type. 

               Always remove old or weak batteries.  Batteries can leak 
               chemicals that destroy electronic circuits.

               Do not mix old and new batteries, different types of 
               batteries (standard, alkaline, or rechargeable) or 
               rechargeable batteries of different capacities.

5.  To replace the cover on the radio, insert its upper edge first then 
    press it down.  Then lift and press down the lock tab to secure the 
    cover.

Testing Internal Batteries

To test the batteries, hold down PWR for about 1 second.  The battery 
voltage briefly appears.  (battery symbol) appears as a battery monitor 
indicator. The more bars inside the icon, the stronger the batteries. When
(battery symbol) flashes, (without any bars inside), replace all the 
batteries as soon as possible.

WARNING:  Dispose of old batteries promptly and properly.  Do not burn or 
          bury them.

CAUTION:  If you do not plan to use the transceiver with batteries for two 
          weeks or more, remove the batteries.

Using rechargeable Batteries

You can use three rechargeable Ni-Cd or Ni-MH batteries to operate the 
transceiver.

The transceiver has a built-in circuit that lets you recharge Ni-Cd and 
Ni-MH batteries while they are in the transceiver.  To charge the 
batteries, set CHG ON/OFF to CHG ON, install the batteries in the 
transceiver, and connect an external AC or DC adapter to the transceiver's 
CHG jack.

To charge the internal rechargeable batteries from standard AC, use 
adapter Cat. No. 273-1662 and a size H Adaptaplug adapter.  To recharge 
them from a vehicle, use Cat. No. 273-1810 and a size H Adaptaplug 
adapter.  These adapters and Adaptaplug adapters are available from your 
local RadioShack store.

CAUTION:  These adapters are designed only to recharge the specified 
          batteries.  Do not attempt to transmit using either adapter to 
          power the radio.

WARNING:  Do not connect an adapter to the transceiver if non-rechargeable 
          batteries (such as alkaline batteries) are installed in the 
          transceiver and CHG ON/OFF is set to ON, or if you are unsure of 
          the switch's position.  Non-rechargeable batteries will get hot 
          and can even explode if you try to recharge them.

Fully discharged batteries can take as long as 10 to 18 hours to fully
recharge.  If you use the transceiver while the batteries are charging, 
charging takes longer.

CAUTION:  Do not overcharge Ni-Cd batteries.

Notes:  Nickel-cadmium batteries last longer and deliver more power if you 
        occasionally let them fully discharge.  To do this, simply use the 
        transceiver until (battery symbol) flashes.

        To prevent damage to nickel-cadmium batteries, never charge them 
        in an area where the temperature is above 113 degrees F or below 
        40 degrees F.

        As Ni-Cd and Ni-MH batteries provide less voltage than that 
        typically supplied by alkaline batteries, expect less transmitting 
        output power when you use the transceiver with Ni-Cd or Ni-MH 
        battery power.

IMPORTANT:  This transceiver can use nickel-cadmium rechargeable 
            batteries.  At the end of a nickel-cadmium battery's useful 
            life, it must be recycled or disposed of properly.  Contact 
            your local, county, or state hazardous waste management 
            authorities for information on recycling or disposal programs 
            in your area.  Some options that might be available are:
            municipal curbside collection, drop-off boxes at retailers
            such as your local RadioShack store, recycling collection
            centers, and mail-back programs.

Using AC Power

You can power the transceiver using a 6V regulated DC power supply that 
delivers at least 600-mA (such as Cat. No. 273-1680), and a size H 
Adaptaplug adapter (neither supplied).  Both are available at your local 
RadioShack store.

CAUTIONS:  You must use a Class 2 power source that supplies 6V regulated 
           DC and delivers at least 600 mA.  Its center tip must be set to 
           positive and its plug must fit the transceiver's CHG (-)(-)(+)
           Jack. Using an adapter that does not meet these specifications
           could damage the transceiver or the adapter.

           Always connect the AC adapter to the transceiver before you 
           connect it to AC power.  When you finish, disconnect the 
           adapter from AC power before you disconnect it from the 
           transceiver.

Follow these steps to power the transceiver from standard AC power.

1.  If the adapter has a voltage switch, set the switch to 6V.

2.  Insert the Adaptaplug adapter into the AC adapter's cord so it reads 
    TIP +.

3.  Insert the adapter's cord into CHG (-)(-)(+) on the transceiver.

4.  Plug the adapter's other end into a standard AC outlet.

Using Vehicle Battery Power

You can power the transceiver from a vehicle's 12V power source or 
cigarette-lighter socket using a 6-volt, 600 mA DC-to-DC power adapter 
(such as Cat. No. 273-1815), and a size H Adaptaplug adapter (neither 
supplied).  Both are available at your local RadioShack store.

CAUTIONS:  You must use a power source that supplies 6V DC and delivers at 
           least 600 mA.  Its center tip must be set to positive and its 
           plug must fit the transceiver's CHG (-)(-)(+) jack.  Using an 
           adapter that does not meet these specifications could damage 
           the transceiver or the adapter.

           Always connect the DC adapter to the transceiver before you 
           connect it to the power source.  When you finish, disconnect 
           the adapter from the power source before you disconnect it from 
           the transceiver. 

Follow these steps to operate the transceiver from a vehicle's battery. 

1.  Insert the Adaptaplug adapter into the DC adapter's cord so it reads
    TIP +.

2.  Connect the adapter to the transceiver's CH (-)(-)(+) jack.

3.  Plug the other end of the adapter into the cigarette-lighter socket in
    the vehicle.

Note:  Use an externally-mounted antenna when transmitting from inside a 
       vehicle.  The RF generated from the supplied rubber ducky antenna 
       might affect the transceiver's operation.

Connecting The Antenna

Place the threaded base socket of the supplied antenna over the antenna 
connector on top of the transceiver and turn the antenna clockwise to 
tighten it.  To remove it, turn it counterclockwise. 

CAUTION:  Do not over-tighten the antenna

Note:  You can connect an external antenna to the transceiver using an 
       SMA-to-BNC adapter.  This adapter and suitable antennas are 
       available at your local RadioShack store.

Attaching The Belt Clip

Use a Phillips screwdriver and the two supplied screws to attach the 
supplied belt clip to your transceiver.  Do not over-tighten the screws.

Attaching The Wrist Strap

To attach the supplied wrist strap to the top of the belt clip, thread the 
strap's small loop through the opening in the top of the clip. Then insert 
the longer loop through the smaller loop and pull on the strap until the
loop is tight.

Connecting a Microphone/Speaker

You can connect an external communications headset (consisting of a 
microphone and speaker) to the transceiver so you can use it privately.
Lift the hinged, rubber dust cover from the MIC and SPK jacks on top of 
the transceiver.  Then insert the plug of an optional voice activated 
headset with microphone, or an optional communication headset, into the 
jacks.

CAUTION:  Use only microphone and speaker accessories that do not share a 
          common ground for the speaker and the microphone.  Doing 
          otherwise might damage the transceiver.

Note:  Connecting a headset's plug to the transceiver's SPK jack 
       automatically disconnects the internal speaker.

You can also connect an optional mono earphone to the SPK jack. This lets
you use the transceiver's push-to-talk button to transmit as usual.  Your
local RadioShack store carries a wide selection of suitable communications
headsets, earphones, and separate components.

Using The Menu

The transceiver provides a menu to access its features.  To see details 
about each operation, refer to the following chart.

To access the menu, turn on the transceiver then hold down F while you 
press SET.  Rotate CH clockwise to access the various options.  Press /\ 
or \/ to change an option's setting.

                  Setting Range                                      See
                  ( ) = Default                                    Faxback
Menu Options         setting               Description              Doc. #

sq                0 to 5 (1)               Sets the squelch.        58622
(Squelch setting)

r1                .00 kHz (no offset)      Sets the offset in       58622
(Repeater Offset  8.0 MHz in 5 kHz steps   5 kHz steps between
for VHF)          steps.  (600 kHz)        the repeater's 
                                           transmit and receive
                                           frequencies.

r2                .00 kHz (no offset)      Sets the offset in       58622
(Repeater Offset  8.0 MHz in 100 kHz       100 kHz steps between
for UHF)          steps.  (5 MHz)          the repeater's transmit
                                           and receive frequencies.

rt                See the Sub Audible      Lets you select one of   58623
(Receive Tone)    Tone Frequency chart     50 different receiving
                  in Faxback Doc. #        subaudible tones or turn
                  58623.  (88.5)           the feature off.

tt                See the Sub Audible      Lets you select one of   58623
(Transmit Tone)   Tone Frequency chart     50 different transmitting
                  in Faxback Doc. #        subaudible tones or turn  
                  58623.  (88.5)           the feature off.

A Quick Look At The Controls

Most of the controls on the transceiver have multiple functions. Reviewing
the following chart will help you understand the function of each control.

  PTT (Push-to-Talk)            Function (F)
 
  MIC (Microphone)              CH (Change Frequency)

  VOL (Volume)                  Display
 
  Speaker

KEY/CONTROL        USE IT TO:             USE WITH THE F + KEY TO:

VOL                Adjust the volume      N/A

CH                 Directly change the    Step through the frequencies in
                   Frequency, one digit   1 MHz steps (144, 145, 146, 147)
                   at a time.

PWR                Turn on the power.     N/A

M (DTMF)           Override squelch.      Access the DTMF program mode.

1 (T. SQ)          Enter 1                Press to turn on the tone 
                                          squelch when transmitting (T
                                          appears).  Press twice to turn
                                          on the tone squelch when 
                                          transmitting and receiving (TSQ
                                          appears).

2 (SET)            Enter 2                Access the menu setting options.

3 (+/-)            Enter 3                Reverse the repeater offset.

4 (PS)             Enter 4                Turn on or off the power save 
                                          option.  [S] appears.

5 (APO)            Enter 5                Access the Auto Power Operation
                                          mode.

6 (CLR)            Enter 6                Clear the memory.

7 (STEP)           Enter 7                Change the frequency step.

8 (BEEP)           Enter 8                Enable/disable the key tone.

9 (TOT)            Enter 9                Sets the time of the limiting 
                                          Transmit Duration (Time-Out 
                                          Timer).

/\ (*)             Change (increase)      Step through frequencies in 
                   the frequency by the   1 MHz increments.
                   increment set by STEP.
                   Enter E in the DTMF
                   program mode.

0                  Enter 0                N/A

\/ (#)             Change (decrease)      Step backward through 
                   the frequency by the   frequencies in 1 MHz 
                   set increment (set     decrements.
                   using STEP). Enter F
                   in the DTMF program
                   mode.

VFO (BAND A)       Set the transceiver    Select the VHF, weather, or UHF
                   to the VFO mode.       band.
                   Enter A in the DTMF
                   mode.

MR (ME B)          Enter the memory       Store a frequency in a memory
                   Setting mode. Enter    location.
                   B in the DTMF mode.

SC (Key symbol)    Start and stop         Lock the controls and keys 
(C)                Scanning. Enter C in   except PTT, M, F, PWR, and VOL.
                   the DTMF mode.         Press again to unlock.

CALL (CM D)        Display, and switch    Store the calling frequency.
                   to, the current call
                   frequency.  Enter D
                   in the DTMF mode.

A Quick Look At The Display

1.  [F] - appears when F (function) key is pressed.

2.  TSQ - appears when Tone Squelch (CTCSS) is enabled for transmitting 
    and receiving.

3.  T - appears when Tone Squelch (CTCSS) is enabled for transmitting.

4.  (+) - appears to indicate a positive repeater offset.  (-) indicates a
    negative offset.

5.  WX - appears when the weather band is selected.

6.  TOT - appears when a time for the time out timer is selected.

7.  AP - appears when Auto Power Off is enabled.

8.  [MR] (Memory Channel Recall) - lets you select a memory location using
    CH.

9.  Memory Location - shows the memory channel in use. 

10. 1||||5||||9| - shows the relative signal strength.  The stronger the
    signal, the more lines appear.

11. [S] - appears and flashes when the power save mode is enabled.

12. (Key Symbol) - indicates that the keypad control is disabled to
    prevent accidental setting changes.

13. (Battery symbol) - indicates the battery strength.

14. Frequency display - shows the frequency and other settings.

(BR EB 2/15/00)

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