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  The Syntor, Syntor X, Syntor X9000, MCX100, MCX1000 and Mostar Series Index page
Compiled by Mike Morris WA6ILQ
Maintained by Robert Meister WA1MIK
   


Syntor Introductory Information You should read this page first.

Syntor X9000 Detailed Information:
The the Syntor, the Syntor X, the Syntor X9000, and the trunking Syntor X and X9000E page by Mike Blenderman K7IC   (offsite link).
If you have any flavor of Syntor you will want to bookmark this page !
The original Syntor X9000 Sales Brochure   2.0 MB PDF     Donated by A. Nony Mous
Syntor X9000 Conventional Radio System Operator's Manual   6880100W95-C   971 kB PDF     Donated by A. Nony Mous
Syntor X9000 Trunked and Conventional Operator's Manual   6880100W90-O   1.14 MB PDF     Donated by A. Nony Mous
Syntor X9000E Privacy Plus Radio System Operator's Manual   6880102W26-O   1.02 MB PDF     Donated by A. Nony Mous
Syntor X9000 High Band, UHF and 800 MHz Instruction Manual Supplement   6880100W94-O dated 17-Feb-1986   9.8 MB PDF     Donated by Eric Lemmon WB6FLY
This supplement covers early Syntor X9000 radios, before the applicable manuals were published.
It is intended to be used with the later Syntor X manuals, as follows:
• VHF Syntor X radios, covered in manual 6881060E05
• UHF Syntor X radios, covered in manual 6880100W45
Later Syntor X9000 radios are covered in the following manuals:
• Low-Band Syntor X9000 radios: 6880101W95
• High-Band Syntor X9000 radios: 6880102W05
• UHF Syntor X9000 radios: 6880102W04
A later version of the early X9000 supplement is here.   6880100W94-O dated 09-Sep-1986   7.2 MB PDF
It includes 800 Mhz units and a few more options.
Syntor X9000 High Band Service Manual   6880102W05-O   17.8 MB PDF     Donated by Eric Lemmon WB6FLY
This radio comes in two ranges, 136-154.4 and 150-174 MHz.
Syntor X9000 Low Band Radio System 100 watts 31-50 MHz Service Manual  6880101W95-D   15.6 MB PDF     Donated by Eric Lemmon WB6FLY
This radio came in ONE range! Despite it saying "31-50 MHz" the radio will do 28-54 MHz just fine - as long as you realize that the average low band mobile antenna only does a 1 MHz portion of that band. The only way to get around the 1 MHz limitation is to either use two mobile antennas (which gives two 1 MHz "windows") or to use a screwdriver antenna and a self-contained auto-tuner (like an SGC). The details on the two-antenna setup is in the mobile section of the Antenna Systems page at this web site.
Syntor X9000 UHF Manual 6880102W04-O   6.6 MB PDF     Scanned by Charles Blythe, KD5TKR
This radio came in four ranges: (1) 406-420, (2) 450-470, (3) 470-488, (4) 482-500, (5) 494-512 MHz.
Ranges 3, 4, and 5 are pretty useless to hams (except for parts to convert a Syntor X to a Syntor X9000).
Syntor X9000 / System 9000 Siren-PA   6880101W10-A   3.2 MB PDF Donated by Eric Lemmon WB6FLY
This manual covers the W269AF, W269AH, W589AH and W589AK series units, and both the HLN1184 and HLN1185 kits.
Syntor X9000 / System 9000 HKN4241A control cable schematic   182 kB PDF Donated by Eric Lemmon WB6FLY
This schematic shows the horn and headlights control, normal and SecureNet cabling, and more.
Syntor X9000 / System 9000 Tee-Connector/Cable   297 kB PDF Donated by Eric Lemmon WB6FLY
This is just a scanned schematic of a T-Cable that connects an X9000 radio to a siren box. We don't have the part number of the connector itself, or of the siren box.

Syntor X Detailed Information:
The the Syntor, the Syntor X, the Syntor X9000, and the trunking Syntor X and X9000E page by Mike Blenderman K7IC   (offsite link).
If you have any flavor of Syntor you will want to bookmark this page !
Accessories (mike, speaker, handset, hang-up boxes) 737 kB PDF file
Common Circuits Board (low-band) 1.6 MB PDF file
Common Circuits Board (UHF) 1.8 MB PDF file
Instruction Manual (low-band) 7.8 MB PDF file
Instruction Manual (UHF) 8.6 MB PDF file
Maintenance and Troubleshooting 3.0 MB PDF file
Microcomputer System (low-band) 4.5 MB PDF file
Microcomputer System (UHF) 8.7 MB PDF file
Receiver and Extender (low-band) 5.5 MB PDF file
Receiver (UHF) 4.0 MB PDF file
Rotary Mode-Select Control Head (1985) 1.9 MB PDF file
Rotary Mode-Select Control Head (1989) 5.1 MB PDF file
Synthesizer (low-band) 6.8 MB PDF file
Synthesizer (UHF) 6.0 MB PDF file
Transmitter (low-band) 3.1 MB PDF file
Transmitter (UHF) 4.1 MB PDF file

Syntor, Syntor X and MCX100 Amateur Band Programming Information:
http://www.sites.onlinemac.com/pbennett/5857/software.htm   By Paul Bennett N7OCS (offsite link)

Other Syntor and Syntor X Information:
Moving a highband Syntor to 2 meters     By Mark A. Tomany   N9WYS
This article includes a description of the needed VCO modifications.
Modifications to a Motorola Syntor X to Use As A Repeater or Point-to-Point Link Receiver or Transmitter     Scott D. Lichtsinn   KBNLY
Syntor X Mobile Radio Information     By Mike Blenderman  K7IC   (offsite link)
Syntor X Code Plug Information     By Paul Kasley  W9TS   (offsite link)
Syntor X PC Programmable Memory Modules   From Piexx Company (offsite link)
Setting up a Syntor X as a 144.39 MHz APRS radio   by Earl Garber N3EG (offsite link)
Making your own TRN4224A PL tone plug   by Mike Morris WA6ILQ
The TRN4224A Tone Plug is used in internal tone PL boards in radios such as the Mitreks, Syntors, Maxar, the Systems-90 multi-PL mobile encoders and some other devices.
While this article is Mitrek oriented, the information is valid for any equipment that uses the TRN-4224 series of plug-in tone module.
Making your own TRN6005 DPL code plug   by Mike Morris WA6ILQ from information and photos provided by Jerry Matthews WAUZI
Like the tone plug above this module is used on a wide range of equipment including Mitreks, Syntors and the Systems-90 multi-DPL mobile encoders . A quad DPL board for a Micor base station is shown in the article, but the information in this article is applicable to any equipment that uses the TRN6005 series of DPL code plugs.

MCX100 and Syntor PROM Information:
The MCX100 requires a PROM burner for programming and is similar in that respect to the Syntor, whereas the MCX1000 is fully programmable using RVN4011 RSS, like the Spectra.
Syntor and MCX PROM replacement   By Ted Maczulat VE7TFM   188 kB PDF
MCX100 UHF manual   Part number 6881045E30-O   8.5 MB PDF donated by Eric Lemmon WB6FLY
MCX100 VHF DVP Manual   Part number 6881063E25-O   15.4 MB PDF donated by Eric Lemmon WB6FLY
This manual covers the D23EXA, T23EXA (both are 10 watts), D43EXA or T43EXA (both are 30 watts) series of radios.
The same manual in six sections:   Part 1, 1.2 MB     Part 2, 5.8 MB     Part 3, 3.7 MB     Part 4, 5.3 MB     Part 5, 5.0 MB     Part 6, 8.8 MB
Complete TPN1136A power supply schematic and parts list   370 kB PDF extracted from the MCX100 manual above
Also has info on the TLN5274B regulator board, the TRN6282A chassis and the TKN6948A, TKN6949A, TKN8199A cable kits.
Moto changed the board mid-production but didn't change the board number.
Click here for the early TPN1136A power supply schematic only (40 kB PDF)       Click here for the later TPN1136A power supply schematic only (41 kB PDF)
This power supply was used on the low power base station versions of the MCX100, the Maxar and the Maxar-80.
TPN1154A power supply schematic and parts list   530 kB PDF
Also has info on the TLN5274B, TRN6561A, TKN6948A, TKN6949A, TKN8199A kits.
This power supply was used on the high power base station versions of the MCX100, the Maxar and the Maxar-80.
PROM to EPROM Adapter Boards for the Syntor and MCX100 from Andy Brinkley of Brinkley Electronics in Winston-Salem, North Carolina   (offsite link)
These boards let you use more modern chips in place of the unobtainable old ones that Moto used.
A board specifically for the Syntor       A board specifically for the MCX100   (offsite links)
For the Syntor-X use the Xcat mentioned above.

MCX1000 Information:
The MCX1000 RSS manual is part number 6802902A30.
MCX1000 VHF Service Manual   Part number 6802902A17-B   8.7 MB PDF file     Donated by Eric Lemmon WB6FLY
A note from Eric: The "Diagnostic Test Plug" is mentioned twice in the manual, once in Section 3.6.2 (Oscillator Frequency Adjustment), and once in Section 3.6.3 (Deviation Adjustment). The Test Plug is Motorola Part #0180358A54 and while it is no longer available you can make your own. It is nothing more than an RJ-45 (8-wire) modular plug that has a jumper between pins 4 and 5. Those are the middle two pins, so it's hard to get it wrong.
The book for the MCX1000 touchtone microphone (the VXN1017A) can be found here as a 1.2 MB PDF file.

Mostar Information:
Mostar Information and Programming Source   Andy Brinkley of Brinkley Electronics in Winston-Salem, North Carolina   (offsite link)
While his web site may not specifically say Mostar he does have the equipment to do them.
Note:  Repeater-Builder is looking for a schematic (even a hand-drawn one that you traced out) of the MIB (Mostar Interface Box)... even Moto's own MIB service manual (6880900Z57) doesn't have the schematic.   The MIB is different enough from standard RIB that it can't be used to program a Mostar.

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Motorola® is a registered trademark of Motorola Inc.   Image used with permission.
Syntor, Syntor X, Syntor X9000, Syntor X2, Syntor X3, the stylized / drop shadowed X, MCX, Mostar, MCX100 and MCX1000 are all registered trademarks of Motorola Inc.

This web page, this web site, the information presented in and on its pages and in these modifications and conversions is © Copyrighted 1995 and (date of last update) by Kevin Custer W3KKC and multiple originating authors. All Rights Reserved, including that of paper and web publication elsewhere.